Hiroshima Graph - Rabbits abandon their children

 

Okunoshima is a small island, only about 4 kilometers wide and a short distance from Tadanoumi in the city of Takehara, Hiroshima Pref. It gained its reputation as "Rabbit Island" for the immense rabbit population which thrived in the warm climate of the straits after they were released into the wild after the war. A national vacation village was also constructed so that tourists from both home and abroad could enjoy the island as a resort destination, and camp and swim in the ocean. 

But its quaint exterior belies a deadly truth: Okunoshima is also known as "Poison Gas Island" for the role it played in producing poisonous gases after the World War 2, a legacy left behind in the empty husks of the factories peppering the island. Here, chemical weaponry was manufactured from the second Sino-Japanese War all through World War 2. The laborers who worked here, some 6,700 people in total, suffered the effects of their work long after the war was through, much like the people who experienced the atomic bomb first-hand. Many still struggle with guilt for their complicity in the deaths of countless others.

The school curriculum that harped on peace education to the point of tedium up until this point had never presented me the opportunity to learn of the dark underbelly of the island's history. Life in Hiroshima showed me only a landscape damaged by the war, where we kept the ambiguous word known only as "peace" close to our hearts in a city known only for surviving the atomic bomb. In contrast, this tiny island in Hiroshima quietly harbored a history of wrongdoing. 

It's important to understand the extent of the damage the island faced, yet to use it as yet another appeal for peace would ring only as a hollow platitude. So what better narrator to the horrors of war but a player in its poisonous legacy; the factories themselves where the gas was produced. Nothing can convey its disasters quite so profoundly, and hopefully my photographs can act as the impetus to their reveal.

However, the relationship between Okunoshima and war goes back even further to the Russo-Japanese war, when it was outfitted with several forts to safeguard the then-military establishment of Kure. 

After the war, the Japanese military complex found itself lagging behind other countries in the race to develop poisonous gases, so they had their scientists in Tokyo redouble their efforts, and established Okunoshima as the base of their mass-production operations. At its peak production in 1941, they facility produced more than 1600 tons of chemicals, each named after a different color depending on effect: yellow, brown, red, and green, specifically. 

The existence of the island itself was kept strictly confidential, and maps produced for public use in 1938 showed only a void where Okunoshima should have been. Many people came from the other side of the island to work at the factory, but they were sworn not to tell anyone of their work. People who stare at the island locals were accused of being spies, and the train to Kure which ran along the coast would shutter its windows when crossing in sight of the island. In short, there was a very tight leash on any information about the island at all. 

In addition to all of this, the factory also used as ammunition depot for American troops during the Korean War, so it has had a long history with warfare.

Meanwhile, the Japanese government has choosing instead to draw a curtain over their negative attributes in this regard. Once they finally succumb to the elements, the relics of war that remain here now will be lost to the ages. There are 2,000 people alive today who were once laborers on the island, and at this point, many of them who worked directly with poison gas are over 90 years old. We're running out of time to collect their first-hand accounts; however, we owe it to our future generations to tell their stories. As a photographer who hails from Hiroshima, I can only hope that my photos can serve to pass on the truth.

 

 

Yoshikatsu Fujii

 

 

 

 

 

 

戦後71年を経た被爆都市広島。街に残された戦争の名残りは色褪せ、その壮絶な体験を証言できる被爆者も少なくなっている。そうした危機感から、この街に残る記憶の痕跡を見つめ直し、広島から発信していく試みとしてHiroshima Graphという写真プロジェクトに取り組んでいる。そして広島と戦争の歴史を調査していくなかで、大久野島のことを知った。

 

大久野島は広島県竹原市忠海町の沖合いに浮かぶ周囲約4キロ程の小さな島で、戦後放たれた数羽のウサギが瀬戸内の温暖な気候の中で繁殖し「ウサギ島」として知られるようになった。この島には国民休暇村が建てられ、海水浴やキャンプを楽しめるリゾート島として国内外からたくさんの人達が観光に訪れる。

一見とてものどかな島だが、実は「毒ガス島」とも呼ばれ第二次世界大戦以降の化学兵器製造の実態を今に伝える施設跡が、廃墟として島内のいたる所に残されている。この島では、日中戦争から第2次世界大戦にかけて密かに毒ガスの製造が行われていた。労働に従事した人たちは延べ約6700人といわれ、原爆と同じように戦後多くの人々がその後遺症に苦しみ、中には殺戮に加担してしまったという自責の念に苛まれ続ける人もいる。

 

これまでうんざりする程の平和教育を受けてきた私でさえ、この島の隠された歴史についてほとんど知る機会はなかった。広島に住んでいると、平和という掴み所のない言葉が身近に溢れ被曝都市としての戦争の被害の側面しか見えてこない。しかし同じ広島のこの小さな島には、ひっそりと加害の歴史が横たわっているのだ。

どれだけひどい目に遭ったかを知ることはとても重要だが、それだけを訴えていては平和という言葉はいつまでも曖昧な意味しか持ち得ない。戦争の悲惨さの語り部は、かつての毒ガス被害者であり工場跡である。その存在こそが悲惨さを語る。その時、私の写真がそれらの存在を明かすための装置となる。

 

戦争と大久野島との関わりはもっと古く、日露戦争の際に軍都であった呉を防衛する目的で要塞が築かれ、幾つもの砲台が設置された。

その後、毒ガス研究において諸国から遅れをとっていた日本軍は、東京の陸軍科学研究所で研究開発し、大量生産の拠点として大久野島に製造工場を置いた。生産量はピーク時の1941年で年間1600トンにも及び、その種類によって黃、茶、赤、緑と色分けして呼ばれた。

島の存在は秘匿され、1938年に陸軍が発行した一般向け地図では大久野島一帯は空白地域として扱われた。対岸の近隣住民も多く働いていたが、島で行われていることの一切の他言を禁じられた。また島の方をじっと見ていただけでスパイの嫌疑をかけられたり、海岸に沿って走る呉線の列車は忠海に差し掛かると鎧戸を閉めさせられるなど、情報の漏洩は徹底して防止された。

また朝鮮戦争の際には工場がアメリカ軍の弾薬庫として使用されるなど、長く戦争に利用されてきた歴史を持つ。

 

日本政府はこうした負の部分を見せたがらず、この島にある戦争遺跡の保存にもあまり積極的ではない。それらは崩れてしまえばそれでお終いというのが現状なのだ。

またかつての島の労働者で現在の存命者は約2000人といわれるが、その中でも直接毒ガス製造に従事していた人となるとほとんどが90歳を越えている。直に証言を得られる時間はそう多く残されていないのだ。しかし私たちにはその事実をまた次の世代へと伝えていく責務がある。広島に産まれた写真家として、私の写真がこの事実を明かすための一助となることを望んでいる。

 

 

 

 

 

FEATURE

 

LensCulture